Articles et communications

Who Shares ? Who Doesn’t ? Factors Associated with Openly Archiving Raw Research Data

Abstract Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have (...)


Linked open drug data

Abstract
There is an abundance of information about drugs available on the Web. Data sources range from medicinal chemistry results, over the impact of drugs on gene expression, to the outcomes of drugs in clinical trials. These data are typically not connected together, which reduces the ease with which insights can be gained. Linking Open Drug Data (LODD) is a task force within the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLS IG). LODD has surveyed publicly available data about drugs, created Linked Data representations of the data sets, and identified interesting scientific and business questions that can be answered once the data sets are connected. The task force provides recommendations for the best practices of exposing data in a Linked Data representation. In this paper, we present past and ongoing work of LODD and discuss the growing importance of Linked Data as a foundation for pharmaceutical R&D data sharing.


Linking to Data – Effect on Citation Rates in Astronomy

We will be examining one practice that is very relevant to astronomy : is there a difference, from a bibliometric point of view, between articles that link to data and articles that do not ? Specifically, is there a difference in citation rates between these classes of articles ?
Using the data holdings of the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System, our analysis shows that articles with data links are indeed cited more than articles without these links - for this data set, articles with data links acquired 20% more citations (compared to articles without these links).


The plate tectonics of research data publication

In biology, the fields of macromolecular structural biology and sequence bioinformatics have, since the 1970s, had established international databases for the deposition of data, and journal policies mandating such deposition prior to acceptance for publication of manuscripts describing the data. Similar good practices have developed more recently in other disciplines, notably astronomy. But these are the exceptions, and over the majority of scientific fields data publication remains a minority activity. For the most part, this is because the technical barriers to publication of research datasets remain so high, and the academic rewards so low, that such publication is undertaken only by the few who regard it as a moral imperative. However, new policies are combining with new technological capabilities to bring significant change to this publication landscape.

An analogy can perhaps be made with geological plate tectonics. The new policies of funders and journal publishers towards the open publication of research datasets arising from publicly funded research can be likened to a tectonic plate slowly moving forward with inexorable force, that is colliding with the massive stationary continental plate of established scientific practice, in which data are traditionally regarded as belonging to the research group that generated them, in which data sharing occurs only between trusted colleagues on the basis of personal request, and in which the only publications that are truly valued are those of journal articles.


0 | ... | 165 | 170 | 175 | 180 | 185 | 190 | 195 | 200 | 205 | 210

end of article